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Please register in advance by calling 800-723-3873 
or faxing the registration form from this site to: 215-634-6184.

 

Edible Urban Legends:


Many AFSI Students have asked about the vegetable wash product FIT.  Read below a copy of the email we received from Proctor & Gamble.

Subj:     Re: Contact us Request from Tryfit.com
Date:    11/06/2000 4:02:18 PM Eastern Standard Time
From:    frc.im@pg.com

I'm sorry it took so long to respond back.  We've started using a new system, and we're experiencing technical difficulties.  I appreciate your patience.

The answer to the second question is that, while Fit removes wax, dirt, pesticides, and people-handling soils, it's not designed to kill bacteria or prevent growth of bacteria.

Stephanie
USA Fit Team

 

From:    AFSI on 09/25/2000 11:46 PM
To:         Ion Frc-IM/PGI
cc:
Subject: Re: Contact us Request from Tryfit.com

Dear Stephanie,

Thank you for your reply.  While we await your response to our proposal, could you please advise us where we can get some basic information on FIT.  Our instructors are receiving questions in almost every class.

What are the ingredients in FIT?
Does FIT reduce the level or inhibit the growth of foodborne pathogens, especially Listeria?
What is the pH of FIT?

We appreciate your assistance.

Sincerely,  David Nash, CFSP   Marlene Nash, MS, RD


Know your sources: (February, 2000)

We recently received an email stating that a person in Hawaii died from drinking soda from a can that had rodent urine on it. While AFSI strongly recommends that
people make sure that "anything that a person's food or mouth may touch is sanitary", we have concluded that this story is untrue. Further, this email states that this story was authored by a medical professional at a leading health products firm. AFSI has contacted this person who has no knowledge of this email, other than someone "cut and pasted" their name and phone number on it.

Rodent droppings and urine do pose a significant health threat. It is unacceptable for any food contact surface to be contaminated by vermin. This story, however appears to be false. We welcome correspondence from anyone who wishes to inform the public about foodborne illness, but AFSI will confirm the sources after review by a qualified public health professional before posting any information on this website. We also must state that the resources wasted by false stories on the Internet (or anywhere else) are not "funny" and can reduce the ability for public health and medical professionals to respond to legitimate challenges.

David H. Nash, MPH, CFSP, PhD Candidate, Director AFSI


Canít convince people that Mayo is not the culprit in foodborne illness?

The Association of Dressings and Sauces has free information at: